Saturday 2 July 2011 – “Recreational signage”

Transcription on this page

Sign

Lake Burley Griffin circuit
[ACT Government crest]
[Diagram of lake, showing West, Central, and East Basins, oriented to Black Mountain Tower and Parliament House]
28km [Cycle] 2 hours [Walk] 7 hours
_______________
^ Western Loop
[with pointer to the left-hand third of the lake]
16km [Cycle] 1 hour [Walk] 4 hours
_______________
[Information graphic] www.visitcanberra.com.au 1300 554 114
_______________

The first pastoral homestead

The property which became known as ‘Canberry’ was the first land officially settled by Europeans on the Molonglo River. In 1824, John McLaughlin established a 400-hectare river-front outstation here managed by John Joshua Moore.

Like many other pastoral properties, the residence complex consisted of the main homestead building, a series of outbuildings and a tennis court.

Arthur Jeffreys, son-in-law of Robert Campbell of Duntroon, bought the property in 1843 and renamed it ‘Acton’. It was later occupied by a succession of tenants who grazed and cultivated the land. In the 1890s a more substantial homestead was built adjoining the old one.

In 1911 Arthur Brassey and his wife Salome, then owners of ‘Acton Estate’, were the first to be displaced by the Commonwealth in the founding of the nation’s capital. Acton House subsequently housed the Director of Commonwealth Surveys, Charles Scrivener, before being used for administrative purposes by the Federal Capital Commission.

The homestead was demolished in 1941 to make way for the new Canberra Community Hospital which was demolished in 1997 to provide the location for the National Museum of Australia.

[Photo] Acton House, c. 1920
Source: National Library of Australia vn3416301 (Available online)
_______________
[Canberra Tracks logo] See how far you’ve travelled
_______________

Other side of the sign

_______________
[ACT Government crest]
[Diagram of lake showing West, Central, and East Basins, oriented to Black Mountain Tower and Parliament House]
Lake Burley Griffin circuit
28km [Cycle] 2 hours [Walk] 7 hours
_______________
Western Loop
16km [Cycle] 1 hour [Walk] 4 hours >
_______________
National Museum of Australia [sketch]
Symbols for [Views] [Food] [Toilets]
700m [Cycle] 3 mins >
400m [Walk] 7 mins ^
Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
Symbol for [Toilets]
300m [Cycle] 1 min >
250m [Walk] 4 mins ^
_______________
[Information graphic] www.visitcanberra.com.au 1300 554 114
_______________
Great Australian Stories

The National Museum of Australia is devoted to telling great stories about Australia and Australians.

The National Museum of Australia is unlike any conventional museum elsewhere. Even the amazing architecture of the Museum is unique.

The most noticeable design feature is the gigantic sculptural loop which begins at the museum entrance and conceptually continues north-west to Uluru (Ayers Rock) – symbolically linking Australia’s centre with the nation’s political headquarters.

The National Museum of Australia is as much about the future of Australia as it is about the past. With state-of-the-art technology, hands-on displays, guided tours, special exhibitions and events, waterfront dining, a magnificent shop and more, the Museum has something for everyone.

Best of all, general admission is free!

Open 9am-5pm daily
(closed Christmas Day)
Freecall 1800 026 132

[Photo] Museum entrance, with the loop – the most visible part of the Uluru line – in the background.

Photo John Gollings

Source: National Museum of Australia

[Photo] Garden of Australian Dreams

Source: National Museum of Australia

These photos also appear on a web page describing the museum building

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One Response to Saturday 2 July 2011 – “Recreational signage”

  1. albertine says:

    very recreational indeed. I admire the people who assemble these things so patiently and carefully.
    My bullshitometer flashed red at the Uluru stuff, though. Imagine! Politicians grabbing fine art and a sacred site and jamming themselves awkwardly into the middle of those two. ( Hmmmm. I’d like to see a sculpture of THAT! – more a subject for a political cartoonist though, I expect.)

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